Leadership Strategies – How to achieve goals

Leadership Strategies
How to achieve goals

Is your goal worth achieving? A strong leader doesn’t just go out to achieve goals, they use leadership strategies to determine whether a goal is worth pursing or not. One great leadership strategy is to ask a few simple questions to determine if the goal is worth the effort or not. If it is worth it, then determine what the odds are to achieve it.

Use these 5 questions as leadership strategies to determine whether your goal is worth achieving or not:

1. Is this your goal or someone else’s goal?
2. Do you have enough passion about this goal?
3. Is it worth it to pay the price of this goal?
4. Will you be satisfied if you achieve this goal or less fulfilled?
5. Do you have a roadmap or plan to achieve the goal?

These questions will determine whether you have a goal worth pursuing – and if you do, take the action in order to achieve them.

1. Is this your goal or someone else’s goal?

Working to set goals for yourself means you are more committed to achieve it. If it is someone else’s goal, or a goal you think someone else should pursue, you are further removed to the full commitment and completion of the goal.

Take ownership of the goal. This means it has to be yours and you have to commit to achieve it every day!

2. Do you have enough passion about this goal?

If your goal is a nice idea and you think you should pursue it, versus having an undying desire and passion to pursue it will determine how committed you are. If you are passionate about a specific goal, you will have more drive and your commitment level will be higher than if you ‘think’ you should pursue it because it’s a good idea or ‘just’ a good goal.

3. Is it worth it to pay the price of this goal?

Put your back against the wall and do whatever it takes to achieve your goal – that’s the mindset. If you do not have this mindset, then it will be too easy to skip a day, skip a week, or skip a month to your dedication to the goal. Once you skip a day, it gets easier to skip more.

Paying the price means forgoing other ‘distractions’ that take you off your path to achieving your goals. Paying the price is how leaders become leaders. ‘Paying your dues’, so-to-speak, will always give you more opportunity than those who skip steps because they want an easy way out. Paying the price may mean taking the harder path, and the harder path always leads to greater rewards.

4. Will you be satisfied if you achieve this goal or less fulfilled?

Think about how your life will be if you achieve your goal. If it seems like it will be less than satisfactory, maybe you should reassess the goal you are setting and pursuing. You need to have goals that leave you more than satisfied and completely fulfilled. Without satisfaction, goal setting serves no purpose.

Leaders who pursue goals are generally more satisfied as they accomplish things on a daily basis to achieve it. Excellent leadership strategies require day-to-day steps that lead to day-to-day satisfaction and fulfillment. At any time you feel unsatisfied and unfulfilled, it is time to reassess the goal.

5. Do you have a roadmap or plan to achieve the goal?

Without a plan there is no path to success. They say people plan their vacations with more detail and passion than they do their goals that they desire to achieve. A road map for road trip is essential to arrive at a destination. A roadmap to achieve a goal is essential to attain the goal. Leadership strategies require a ‘strategy’ instead of a blind attempt to achieve a goal.

By taking ownership, and having a plan, you have better odds of achieving the goal you set out to pursue. If you have an to these 5 simple questions, you are on the right path to accomplishing your goals. Leadership strategies do not skip a step, and these steps will determine whether or not you can achieve goals and how well you can achieve them.

Other Leadership Related Articles:
Key to Success – Motivation in the Workplace – Ask for Help!
7 Big Differences between a Leader and a Manage

About Glenn Magas